Category Archives: Blog #2. Fleshing out film jargon

Fangirl and Her Fandoms

LONG TAKE Dick simply defines long take as “a shot that lasts more than a minute” (95).  Average shots length in movies last for about ten or twenty seconds.  In my terms, I would define long take as a shot … Continue reading

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A Soldier, a Baseball Team, and a Rich Guy in a Tight Suit

The magic of cinema has been brought to us, the viewer, time and time again. It is the sole reason we continue to go to the theatre. It is why we pay $8 for a ticket, $4 for popcorn, and … Continue reading

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Enter the Toy Story CRASH

I would just like to first start off by saying THANK YOU to the creators of Netflix, because boy do I love films. Not just films though, I love the art of video in general. Since 2005 when YouTube took … Continue reading

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It’s not film studies, it’s film appreciation.

Film techniques and skills get lost in the jargon that people see in the movies but cannot place their tongue on what they just saw. Terminology is what it is: a study of terms used in a particular field. With … Continue reading

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The Director’s Cut

Bernard Dick defines subjective camera as the “shot represents what the character sees” (Dick 56). What this basically means is that the camera is showing the audience what the actor is seeing instead of the entire scene taking place otherwise … Continue reading

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What Do Band of Brothers, The Karate Kid, and The Enemy Below Have in Common?

Hej Allesammen Igen (Hi, Again, Everyone), It is interesting to note, that while I have admired films for all of my adult life, I have never really considered the fact that there are several different names and concepts for different … Continue reading

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Jaws, Jesus, and Jets

Subjective camera- Jaws, directed by Steven Spielberg According to Dick, a subjective camera “represents what the character sees” (p 6). It is a shot in which the audience sees with the character’s exact point of view. Subjective shots do not always … Continue reading

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